Finding real leadership is tough.

We put in the hard work.

Executive Search by Martin Tripp Associates

Expert Knowledge

50+ years’ experience in media, information, technology and entertainment

Obsessive About Delivery

An unparalleled success rate, from an unmatched methodology.

Global Reach

Based in London, we have worked on leadership roles across five continents.

Our Approach

A methodology that ensures success, with a six month guarantee

In a few weeks, we build networks that might take others ten years to complete. On every search,  we will talk to over 100 people to fully map the market and identify the best possible candidates. And then we filter that insight through expert face-to-face interviewing. We are so confident of our process that we offer a six month guarantee on every placement.

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Candidate retention rate after four years
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Our success rate in the last financial year
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Number of assignments our researchers work on at a time

ETHICAL, RELENTLESS, PASSIONATE, INFORMED

We always put our clients’ interests first, and work exclusively on each search. Once we are engaged on a role, we do not give up. We will only take on a client if we can share their passion. Our job is to keep on top of changes in the market so we can help our clients stay ahead of the curve.

We work across the media, information, technology, communications and entertainment industries. This means we can bring best practice from across sectors to your business.

Clients by sector

11%
Entertainment & broadcast
21%
Consumer media (digital, print, events, communications)
13%
B2B communications (digital, print, events, training, agencies)
20%
Data / information (including research and consultancy services)
24%
Tech / e-commerce
11%
Brands / corporates direct

Roles by discipline

15%
C-suite / general management
22%
Creative (editorial, design, event production, content leads)
23%
Commercial / sales leadership
18%
Product / strategy (product directors, strategy leads etc)
11%
Technical (CTOs, CIOs, digital leaders)
11%
Marketing / communications

Our history

Martin Tripp

Martin Tripp

Managing Director

After more than a decade as a manager, writer, and analyst in the UK and Africa, Martin became a headhunter in 1996, and established Martin Tripp Associates in 2008. As well as recruiting across all disciplines in the media sector, Martin has worked with a wide range of non-media clients on senior e-commerce, digital, and communications positions.

martin@trippassociates.co.uk

+44 20 7692 0530 • +44 7961 100 389

Matt D’Cruz

Matt D’Cruz

Partner

A former news editor, Matt has spent much of his career talking to senior executives across all industries. A founder member of Martin Tripp Associates, he has recruited across a huge range of roles, from heads of strategy and product through to editors and audience development leads. Matt became a Partner in the firm in June 2016.

matt@trippassociates.co.uk

+44 20 7692 0530 • +44 7796 326 764

Latest from the Blog

All change for the besieged BBC

It’s been a rough few months for the old British Broadcasting Corporation. With the many criticisms of its coverage of the general election still ringing in its ears, it has seen a surprise fall in the proportion of the British public who see it as a trustworthy source of news. The new Tory government has also been hinting heavily it will review the validity of the license fee in this new era of subscription services. Last week it drew ire for the brutal and mishandled axing of the Victoria Derbyshire show, which has been lauded over the past few years as being a bastion of the sort of public interest journalism the BBC is publicly funded to provide. And now, they have announced cutting 450 jobs in the newsroom.

Bearing bountiful challenges

Little wonder, then, that director general Tony Hall chose last week to step down – with some interpreting it as a pre-emptive move to prevent further strictures being placed on its ability to report on a sitting government.

The reality is, though, that the issues facing the BBC run too deep to be sorted with a single resignation. The entertainment and news worlds have changed, with subscription to entertainment services the norm and the manner in which we increasingly consume news fundamentally changing. Those critical of the BBC have pointed out that it has been slow to adapt – and then when it has, it has done so poorly.

Read More

The race for the next great video format

There are countless examples of digital video genres that shouldn’t work. The popularity of unboxing videos took many people by surprise. After all, who would willingly watch a stranger open a box of toys or make up for minutes on end? Even with the depth of some parasocial relationships, who could have predicted the popularity of mukbang, or social eating, on livestreaming sites? For that matter, who would have foreseen the rise of video game streaming, and the millionaires created off the back of that hobby?

But as much as the content of some videos has shocked more traditional media companies, the actual video formats themselves have also seen some experimentation. YouTube, for instance, with the might of Google behind it, has been everything from a shortform UGC platform to a VOD service. Meanwhile Twitch, Mixer and other competitors have been at the forefront of integrating viewers’ live comments into the broadcast, and TikTok and the late lamented Vine have demonstrated the viability of shortform video content.

So, even with the aftermath of the great Facebook video metric scandal still ringing in our ears (see the recent sale of Unruly) we’re all still keenly aware that audiences are consuming more video. Consequently, the race is on to stay head of the tech trends that will change how they choose to view that video. 

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How Netflix has changed comedy forever

There’s much to be said for Netflix’s data-led commissioning system. Being able to draw circles around shows its users watch, and then commissioning new shows based on where those circles overlap, was an innovative approach to creating content a few years ago. 

Barring one or two shows that seemed like home runs but failed to find audiences – namely BoJack Horseman stablemate Tuca & Bertie – Netflix’s television output is as prodigious as it is popular. Recent figures demonstrate that while its film catalogue has shrunk by 40% since 2014, the amount of TV content has increased by 37%.

Telling funny stories.

The reality is that television, by nature of the amount of time it takes to consume a series compared to a film, provides Netflix and its competitors with content that is ‘stickier’ and keeps people coming back for longer. While this isn’t always to the benefit of the show (recall that Netflix’s collaborations with Marvel were criticised for feeling bloated and each being a few episodes too long ), it keeps people on the platforms for longer. 

As evidence of quite how valuable television content is for streaming services, remember that Netflix paid Warner $100 million to keep Friends on the platform throughout 2019, and it was seen as a bargain. The reason? When it comes to streaming services, exclusive shows and films are the jewels in the crown, and when a service doesn’t have those proven, guaranteed hits, it has to try other things. 

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