Finding real leadership is tough.

We put in the hard work.

Executive Search by Martin Tripp Associates

Expert Knowledge

50+ years’ experience in media, information, technology and entertainment

Obsessive About Delivery

An unparalleled success rate, from an unmatched methodology.

Global Reach

Based in London, we have worked on leadership roles across five continents.

Our Approach

A methodology that ensures success, with a six month guarantee

In a few weeks, we build networks that might take others ten years to complete. On every search,  we will talk to over 100 people to fully map the market and identify the best possible candidates. And then we filter that insight through expert face-to-face interviewing. We are so confident of our process that we offer a six month guarantee on every placement.

0
%
Candidate retention rate after four years
0
%
Our success rate in the last financial year
0
Number of assignments our researchers work on at a time

ETHICAL, RELENTLESS, PASSIONATE, INFORMED

We always put our clients’ interests first, and work exclusively on each search. Once we are engaged on a role, we do not give up. We will only take on a client if we can share their passion. Our job is to keep on top of changes in the market so we can help our clients stay ahead of the curve.

We work across the media, information, technology, communications and entertainment industries. This means we can bring best practice from across sectors to your business.

Clients by sector

11%
Entertainment & broadcast
21%
Consumer media (digital, print, events, communications)
13%
B2B communications (digital, print, events, training, agencies)
20%
Data / information (including research and consultancy services)
24%
Tech / e-commerce
11%
Brands / corporates direct

Roles by discipline

15%
C-suite / general management
22%
Creative (editorial, design, event production, content leads)
23%
Commercial / sales leadership
18%
Product / strategy (product directors, strategy leads etc)
11%
Technical (CTOs, CIOs, digital leaders)
11%
Marketing / communications

Our history

Martin Tripp

Martin Tripp

Managing Director

After more than a decade as a manager, writer, and analyst in the UK and Africa, Martin became a headhunter in 1996, and established Martin Tripp Associates in 2008. As well as recruiting across all disciplines in the media sector, Martin has worked with a wide range of non-media clients on senior e-commerce, digital, and communications positions.

martin@trippassociates.co.uk

+44 20 7692 0530 • +44 7961 100 389

Matt D’Cruz

Matt D’Cruz

Partner

A former news editor, Matt has spent much of his career talking to senior executives across all industries. A founder member of Martin Tripp Associates, he has recruited across a huge range of roles, from heads of strategy and product through to editors and audience development leads. Matt became a Partner in the firm in June 2016.

matt@trippassociates.co.uk

+44 20 7692 0530 • +44 7796 326 764

Latest from the Blog

Resource, not news source: How service journalism can help news publishers thrive

Recycled as ballot papers

Last week, I wrote that ad-funded digital news publishers were having a terrible time. But there are some reasons for optimism, if publishers are prepared to think more strategically.

It’s been apparent for a few years that US regional titles are performing better than their UK counterparts, despite costs being taken out en masse by their owners. It’s an apples-to-oranges comparison to some extent, given that the scale of ‘local’ is so different between the two countries, but the reality is that US local news titles are looking more sustainable than your average local paper (which isn’t actually saying all that much).

There are a few reasons why that might be the case: In the UK regional publishers tend to take costs out from local titles, and retreat to hub-based models that rob each title of truly local content (a rant Matt had five years ago, and which proved to be prescient). That then has a knock-on effect on UK local titles’ websites, which are for the most part unfit for purpose and flooded with low-quality ads in an attempt to salvage all possible revenue.

But the primary reason I would like to believe US titles are in ruder health than UK counterparts is that

Read More

Ripping off the plaster: Job cuts and sustainable journalism

In the red

Last week was a terrible week for digital journalists, with well over 1000 job cuts announced across a swathe of the most popular digital publishers. BuzzFeed announced up to 250 job cuts, which seemed to disproportionately hit BuzzFeed UK. Verizon is looking to cut 800 jobs, or 7% of its global workforce after its CEO announced that each of its three strands – which includes its media properties such as Huffington Post and AOL – should be sustainable in their own right. And Gannet cut 20 jobs as part of a restructuring ahead of a rumoured buyout.

Reactions to the cuts have been emotional and frequently incendiary. Media Twitter has been awash with journalists expressing condolences and wishing the best for their peers, with many editors advertising potential positions within their own organisations. On the other side of the spectrum, former BuzzFeed staffer Jason Sweeten used BuzzFeed’s own platform to create a quiz lambasting the organisation for letting so many

Read More

How much does an Oscar nomination cost?

What would you spend to win an Oscar?

This year’s list of Oscar nominations for best film is notable for a number of reasons – but primarily for the inclusion of two new entrants to the category: Marvel Studios for Black Panther, and Netflix for Roma. But the two illustrate very different business models.

Black Panther – nominated for seven Oscars – cost an estimated $200m to make, and has taken $1.3bn so far at the box office. That’s an earnings ratio of 6.5x (excluding marketing and distribution costs). This is good, even by Marvel’s money-making standards: the previous five Marvel films had average budgets of $250m, and takings of $925m (3.7x budget).

Roma cost $15m and took, er, $217,000 in a limited cinema release, an earnings ratio of 0.014x production costs – or, more straightforwardly, a loss of $14.8m. It is estimated that Netflix has spent an additional $25m on promoting the film ensure an Oscar or two. Clearly, Netflix has a different ambition in mind rather than profit: it wants to be taken seriously as a filmmaker, and it wants

Read More

WE TWEET